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Articles for 'mercury'

Alice in Wonderland has been released in the movie theaters today. The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has been quick to remind us of the Mad Hatter and mercury exposures.

Workers' Compensation News - May 10, 2005 Volume 3 Issue 305

Cancer Reported as the Leading Cause of Job Fatalities in the World - New Report Reveals That Medicare is Covering $23 Billion in Medical Costs That Should be Paid by Workers' Compensation 

Workers' Compensation News - December 1, 2004 Volume 2 Issue 242

U.S. Department of Labor Assumes Responsibility For a New Energy Workers’ Compensation Program --2nd Annual Seminar: This Year in Workers' Compensation - The Top Issues and Cases-California Injured Workers File A Class Action to Keep Their Physicians --New Warning Issued for Remicade --Occupational Carcinogens Listed --CMS Assist (tm) Announced at NOSSCR Disability Law Conference  

Workers' Compensation News - January 25, 2004 Volume 2 Issue 4

Silica Exposure and Systemic Vasculitis: Work in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities has exposed workers to multiple toxic agents leading to acute and chronic diseases. Many exposures were common to numerous work sites. Exposure to crystalline silica was primarily restricted to a few facilities. -- President Bush Recognizes $2 Billion Federal Workers' Compensation Losses: The cost of Federal workplace injuries, when measured by workers' compensation losses, is more than $2 billion and 2 million lost production days annually. In fiscal year 2003, the Federal workforce of almost 2.7 million filed more than 168,000 injury claims. -- Amicus to "twist government's arm" on corporate crime: A trade union says it intends to increase the pressure on ministers if the government fails to introduce a corporate killing law.  

Report to Congress on Workers' Home Contamination Study

In 1992, the U.S. Congress passed the Workers' Family Protection Act (Public Law 102-522, 29 U.S.C. 671), which requested that the CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety And Health (NIOSH) conduct a study to "evaluate the potential for, prevalence of, and issues related to the contamination of workers' homes with hazardous chemicals and substances...transported from the workplaces of such workers."

Workers' Compensation News - March 17, 2004 Volume 2 Issue 12 CompAssist (tm)
 FORMER DIRECTOR OF NJ DIVISION OF WORKERS COMPENSATION INDICTED Harry Parkin, formerly one of Mercer County's highest-ranking officials, was in...
Supreme Court Sets High Judicial Threshold For Evaluating Scientific Evidence
For the last few decades, the most compelling issue in an occupational disease case has been the manner in which the workers’ compensation court shoul...
The Puzzle of Proof in an Occupational Disease Case: Does Anything Go?

The concept of a compensable industrial disease has developed only recently and its acceptance has lagged far behind that of industrial accidents.   The original Workers' Compensation Acts, as promulgated from the year 1911 forward by many of the states, did not provide for the recognition of occupational illness and disease as compensable events.

NJ Workers' Compensation Paid $1.1 Billion in 2000
 The Burden of Occupational Illness and Injury in New Jersey In New Jersey, there are approximately 4.0 million individuals employed in the work...

 Workers can inadvertently carry hazardous materials home from work on their clothes, skin, hair, tools, and in their vehicles. As a result, families of these workers have been exposed to hazardous substances and have developed various health effects. Health effects have also occurred when the home and the workplace are not distinct -- such as on farms or in homes that involve cottage industries.

Woman Looks Back At Her Toxic N.J. Youth

Her body's betrayals, in her 45 years, range from asthma to infertility, from miscarried quadruplets to malformed organs. She wears a scar across her throat like a necklace that binds her to others who have had thyroid tumors removed.  

Workers’ Compensation News - December 1, 2003 Volume 1 Issue 35
 ASBESTOS CONGRESS POSTPONES ACTION ON ASBETSOS COMPENSATION BILL FOR AT LEAST 4 MONTHS As the Senate rushed toward its holiday adjournment, ...
Beryllium: Where was it used (Covered Facilities)

A list of all jurisdictions and facilities. 

 First-Time Information About Exposure Levels for the U.S. Population 

 How the Civil Justice System Uncovered the Truth for Consumers  Before journalists wrote about it, before NHTSA investigated it, before ...
Industrial Disease: The Quest for Recognition--The Need for Adequate Benefits

The concept of a compensable industrial disease has developed only recently and its acceptance has lagged far behind that of industrial accidents. The original Workers' Compensation Acts, as promulgated from the year 1911 forward by many of the states, did not provide for the recognition of occupational illness and disease as compensable events. As demands have been placed upon the medical system to treat and to prevent occupational illness, the legal system, under social, economic, and political pressure, has sought to provide a remedy for the thousands of injured workers who have suffered and who are continuing to suffer from occupational illness and disease. 

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